August 12, 2014
allaboutmarilynmonroe:

 

allaboutmarilynmonroe:

 

6:45pm
  
Filed under: Marilyn Monroe 
May 27, 2014

May 27, 2014

(Source: retronaut.com)

May 16, 2014

(via mejulie1703)

12:00am
  
Filed under: marilyn monroe 
May 12, 2014

Marilyn by Carlyle Blackwell in 1952.

Marilyn by Carlyle Blackwell in 1952.

(Source: alwaysmarilynmonroe)

April 28, 2014
Beautiful dreamer by Chickeyonthego http://flic.kr/p/682exr

Beautiful dreamer by Chickeyonthego http://flic.kr/p/682exr

6:57pm
  
Filed under: IFTTT Flickr marilyn monroe 
April 28, 2014

Marilyn Monroe by Jack Cardiff, 1956.

Marilyn Monroe by Jack Cardiff, 1956.

(Source: elsiemarina, via realbronxbetty)

10:05am
  
Filed under: marilyn monroe 
April 16, 2014

Beyoncé for OUT Magazine’s May 2014 Power Issue

HOW COULD BEYONCE’ THINK SHE LOOKS SHE’S FLATTERING  BE POSING AS MARILYN?

(Source: thebeyhive, via artmonsters)

January 18, 2014
missmonroes:

Marilyn Monroe photographed by Bert Stern 1962

Marilyn!How could you leave us?

missmonroes:

Marilyn Monroe photographed by Bert Stern 1962

Marilyn!How could you leave us?

(via )

3:37am
  
Filed under: marilyn monroe 
December 31, 2013

Marilyn and Danny Kaye at St Jude’s Hospital Benefit fund on July 23rd 1953.

The more I see this woman the more I realize she is almost the absolute most gorgeous, not more than Brigitte Bardot, but her body posturing and the way her face and eyes play with the photographer, well it brings her VERY close to being the most beautiful woman ever!

Marilyn and Danny Kaye at St Jude’s Hospital Benefit fund on July 23rd 1953.

The more I see this woman the more I realize she is almost the absolute most gorgeous, not more than Brigitte Bardot, but her body posturing and the way her face and eyes play with the photographer, well it brings her VERY close to being the most beautiful woman ever!

(Source: alwaysmarilynmonroe)

2:41am
  
Filed under: marilyn monroe 
December 11, 2013
"deep down, i`m pretty superficial." on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/33143879/via/irkajavasdream?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=image_share&utm_source=tumblr

"deep down, i`m pretty superficial." on We Heart It. http://weheartit.com/entry/33143879/via/irkajavasdream?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=image_share&utm_source=tumblr

November 27, 2013

LEAVING AMA’S 
After performing a tribute to Marilyn and JFK’s affair. He dumped her after the media found out about photos with her….he denied any affair. She was in love with him. She wore a dress that looks like this but in a dress form. Gaga you are amazing!!

LEAVING AMA’S 

After performing a tribute to Marilyn and JFK’s affair. He dumped her after the media found out about photos with her….he denied any affair. She was in love with him. She wore a dress that looks like this but in a dress form. Gaga you are amazing!!

October 31, 2013
2011 Kate Upton

2011 Kate Upton

(Source: lesbeehive.com)

August 17, 2013
THIS IS BASED ON A DRESS BY MARILYN MONROE. Gaga in gown for Marilyn tribute or worship. Gown was in one of Marilyn Monroe’s famous movies. Who knows which?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

THIS IS BASED ON A DRESS BY MARILYN MONROE. Gaga in gown for Marilyn tribute or worship. Gown was in one of Marilyn Monroe’s famous movies. Who knows which?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

(Source: karloottagermanotta, via artpop-gypsy)

August 4, 2013
missingmarilyn:


   A week later I received a note from my mother [Paula] describing how my father had been too grief stricken to speak at first. Weeping, he began by saying, “I know [Marilyn] would not have wanted us to mourn, but grief is human and words must be spoken.” He had gone on, his voice shaking with his sorrow, and Mom had worried he might not be able to finish, but he had. She enclosed a copy of what my father had written. Mom spoke of Marilyn’s optimistic plans for the future and how they had expected her to fly to New York the next weekend. “Unquestionably it was an accident. But that is how the wheel turns. We are all sad. We love you.” Sitting on my brass bed from the Napoleonic campaigns, the carved Renaissance cherubs on the ceiling watching silently, I read my father’s words:
   Marilyn Monroe was a legend.
   In her own lifetime she created a myth of what a poor girl from a deprived background could attain. For the entire world she became a symbol of the eternal feminine.
   But I have no words to describe the myth and the legend. Nor would she want us to do so. I did not know this Marilyn Monroe, nor did she.
   We, gathered here today, knew only Marilyn—a warm human being, impulsive and shy and lonely, sensitive and in fear of rejection, yet ever avid for life and reaching out for fulfillment. I will not insult the privacy of your memory of her—a privacy she sought and treasured—by trying to describe her whom you know, to you who knew her. In our memories of her, she remains alive, not only a shadow on a screen, or a glamorous personality.
   For us Marilyn was a devoted and loyal friend, a colleague constantly reaching for perfection. We shared her pain and difficulties and some of her joys. She was a member of our family. It is difficult to accept the fact that her zest for life has been ended by this dreadful accident.
   Despite the heights and brilliance she had attained on the screen, she was planning for the future; she was looking forward to participating in many exciting things she planned. In her eyes and in mine her career was just beginning. The dream of her talent, which she had nurtured as a child, was not a mirage. When she first came to me, I was amazed at the startling sensitivity which she possessed and which had remained fresh and undimmed, struggling to express itself despite the life to which she had been subjected. Others were as physically beautiful as she was, but there was obviously something more in her, something that people saw and recognized in her performances and with which they identified. She had a luminous quality—a combination of wistfulness, radiance, yearning—that set her apart and yet made everyone wish to be part of it, to share in the childish naîveté which was at once so shy and yet so vibrant.
   This quality was even more evident when she was on the stage. I am truly sorry that you and the public who loved her did not have the opportunity to see her as we did, in many of the roles that foreshadowed what she would have become. Without a doubt, she would have been one of the really great actresses of the stage.
   Now it is all at an end. I hope that her death will stir sympathy and understanding for a sensitive artist and woman who brought joy and pleasure to the world.
   I cannot say good-bye. Marilyn never liked good-byes, but in that peculiar way she had of turning things around so that they faced reality—I will say au revoir. For the country to which she has gone, we must all someday visit.
   Once I began to cry, my tears wouldn’t stop. I didn’t know if I was crying for Marilyn or myself or for all of us. Buddha and Mom were right, life was hard. But at least I could learn from Marilyn and not make the same mistakes. And then life would get easier, wouldn’t it?
   I thought about how fleeting fame was. Marilyn had said, “Fame may go by and so long I’ve had you fame, but that’s not where I live.” I thought about how fickle the world was. As much as it loved and mourned Marilyn now, in time it might forget her; but I knew I never would.

- Susan Strasberg, Marilyn And Me
♡ RIP Marilyn (June 1, 1926 - August 4, 1962) ♡

missingmarilyn:

   A week later I received a note from my mother [Paula] describing how my father had been too grief stricken to speak at first. Weeping, he began by saying, “I know [Marilyn] would not have wanted us to mourn, but grief is human and words must be spoken.” He had gone on, his voice shaking with his sorrow, and Mom had worried he might not be able to finish, but he had. She enclosed a copy of what my father had written. Mom spoke of Marilyn’s optimistic plans for the future and how they had expected her to fly to New York the next weekend. “Unquestionably it was an accident. But that is how the wheel turns. We are all sad. We love you.” Sitting on my brass bed from the Napoleonic campaigns, the carved Renaissance cherubs on the ceiling watching silently, I read my father’s words:

   Marilyn Monroe was a legend.

   In her own lifetime she created a myth of what a poor girl from a deprived background could attain. For the entire world she became a symbol of the eternal feminine.

   But I have no words to describe the myth and the legend. Nor would she want us to do so. I did not know this Marilyn Monroe, nor did she.

   We, gathered here today, knew only Marilyn—a warm human being, impulsive and shy and lonely, sensitive and in fear of rejection, yet ever avid for life and reaching out for fulfillment. I will not insult the privacy of your memory of her—a privacy she sought and treasured—by trying to describe her whom you know, to you who knew her. In our memories of her, she remains alive, not only a shadow on a screen, or a glamorous personality.

   For us Marilyn was a devoted and loyal friend, a colleague constantly reaching for perfection. We shared her pain and difficulties and some of her joys. She was a member of our family. It is difficult to accept the fact that her zest for life has been ended by this dreadful accident.

   Despite the heights and brilliance she had attained on the screen, she was planning for the future; she was looking forward to participating in many exciting things she planned. In her eyes and in mine her career was just beginning. The dream of her talent, which she had nurtured as a child, was not a mirage. When she first came to me, I was amazed at the startling sensitivity which she possessed and which had remained fresh and undimmed, struggling to express itself despite the life to which she had been subjected. Others were as physically beautiful as she was, but there was obviously something more in her, something that people saw and recognized in her performances and with which they identified. She had a luminous quality—a combination of wistfulness, radiance, yearning—that set her apart and yet made everyone wish to be part of it, to share in the childish naîveté which was at once so shy and yet so vibrant.

   This quality was even more evident when she was on the stage. I am truly sorry that you and the public who loved her did not have the opportunity to see her as we did, in many of the roles that foreshadowed what she would have become. Without a doubt, she would have been one of the really great actresses of the stage.

   Now it is all at an end. I hope that her death will stir sympathy and understanding for a sensitive artist and woman who brought joy and pleasure to the world.

   I cannot say good-bye. Marilyn never liked good-byes, but in that peculiar way she had of turning things around so that they faced reality—I will say au revoir. For the country to which she has gone, we must all someday visit.

   Once I began to cry, my tears wouldn’t stop. I didn’t know if I was crying for Marilyn or myself or for all of us. Buddha and Mom were right, life was hard. But at least I could learn from Marilyn and not make the same mistakes. And then life would get easier, wouldn’t it?

   I thought about how fleeting fame was. Marilyn had said, “Fame may go by and so long I’ve had you fame, but that’s not where I live.” I thought about how fickle the world was. As much as it loved and mourned Marilyn now, in time it might forget her; but I knew I never would.

- Susan Strasberg, Marilyn And Me

♡ RIP Marilyn (June 1, 1926 - August 4, 1962) 

(via alwaysmarilynmonroe)

10:07am
  
Filed under: Marilyn marilyn monroe